Moving to a new operating system (whether it’s Windows, OS-X or a Linux OS that’s new to you) it’s often difficult to find what you are looking for — at first, and they all have some kind of a fancy way of displaying system information.

These graphical methods present a nice browsable list of information, but with a terminal command line, however, you can really dig under the hood of your Linux computer’s hardware.

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Many youtube channels incorporate their own thumbnail onto the video. Many does it only for the purpose of clickbait, while most does it to represent the content of that video. No matter the reason, it’s sometimes useful to download that thumbnail. Let’s use a physics video by ilectureonline.com to see how we can get that static thumbnail.

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WordPress has smileys or so-called emojis added in version 4.2+. It added emoji character using javascript and other junk. It slows down the site for no real reason, and many of us don’t use them. Here is how to remove unnecessary HTML and emoji URL calls to every page of your site and speed up your site.

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Linux is one of the most astoundingly functional and utilitarian Operating Systems around when it comes to working from the command line. Need to perform a particular task? Odds are there is an application or script you can use to get it done in the terminal. But, once in a while we all need some changes in our lives, preferably something colourful. So here is a collection of strange, funny, or even downright pointless things you can do right in your Linux terminal.

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Imagine you are listening to internet radio, seeing a show on youtube, or watching a blu-ray movie, and you want to record that particularly sound/music/voice, in a fast way. Maybe something for a school project, or you simply want to make a podcast. But sadly, no “Stereo mix” or “What you hear” can be found on the list of recording devices. You could right-click and then left-click to show every disabled devices, but that won’t work on every systems with a built-in soundcard, especially on laptops.

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winSAT.exe is the Windows System Assessment Tool. It collects information about the processor, memory, 2D graphics, 3D graphics, disk et al in the computer, and then, based on an algorithm, it calculates a score which is the famous Windows Experience Index score. Problem is, every week this Windows performance assessment tool is launched and uses up way to much of the computer’s available resources.

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