Many of the beliefs we have around what constitutes a “good” password are created by what default policies in software, such as Microsoft, teach us. We are led to believe that a minimum length of 8 characters, a good mixture of UPPER and lower-case, numbers characters automatically make a good password. So what constitutes a strong, but also an easy password to remember? Are they in conflict with each other? Not necessarily.
Let’s delve a little into the analysis behind today’s passwords.

Continue reading

In Linux/UNIX, the concept of a user (owner) and group is very fundamental, as everybody want things to be kept secure and properly organized. The system was designed with security and ownership in mind, and this is why every file and directory has an owner and a group associated with it, and they have different permissions to access that particular file. So, how can we manipulate permissions with chmod, umask, chown and chgrp?

Continue reading

If you’re a Linux user, you’ve probably seen references to both sudo and su. These two commands are different ways of gaining root privileges. Each functions in a different way, and different Linux distributions use different configurations by default.

Continue reading

Starting a program, file management, system monitoring and more can all be performed without a single mouse click. Some swear by the command line, while others are happy never to have to encounter that intimidating black screen. If you’re the curious type and want to explore the full power of your Linux system that your GUI conveniently hides, then read on.

Continue reading

Imagine you are listening to internet radio, seeing a show on youtube, or watching a blu-ray movie, and you want to record that particularly sound/music/voice, in a fast way. Maybe something for a school project, or you simply want to make a podcast. But sadly, no “Stereo mix” or “What you hear” can be found on the list of recording devices. You could right-click and then left-click to show every disabled devices, but that won’t work on every systems with a built-in soundcard, especially on laptops.

Continue reading

winSAT.exe is the Windows System Assessment Tool. It collects information about the processor, memory, 2D graphics, 3D graphics, disk et al in the computer, and then, based on an algorithm, it calculates a score which is the famous Windows Experience Index score. Problem is, every week this Windows performance assessment tool is launched and uses up way to much of the computer’s available resources.

Continue reading

Like with previous versions of Windows, it’s usually a good idea to remove or disable certain things, especially if it’s to secure and/or to unbloat a system.

Users over at the Reddit station have collected together a list of all the things you can remove from Win10: Read the full post at Reddit

Systemd is the new system and service manager for Linux. It is a replacement for init system and can manage system startup and services. It starts up and supervises the entire system.
Continue reading